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Fun Fact: Almond milk with ground cinnamon and pure maple syrup is literally one of the most beautifully delicious things in the world

rbpmw:

Just discovered this incredible color lithograph depicting Bob Blackburn at work. It’s by Ronald Joseph, currently in the Smithsonian Collection:
http://americanart.si.edu/collections/search/artwork/?id=71807
Beautiful!

rbpmw:

Just discovered this incredible color lithograph depicting Bob Blackburn at work. It’s by Ronald Joseph, currently in the Smithsonian Collection:

http://americanart.si.edu/collections/search/artwork/?id=71807

Beautiful!

printeresting:

Matt Neff is killing it at The Print Center.

printeresting:

Matt Neff is killing it at The Print Center.

trekwaffle:

itreallyisthelittlethings:

museaway:

obsidianembrace:

sconesforjustice:

thetrekkiehasthephonebox:

bcleazy:

“We just figured that would be a great reference, and we loved that Kirk didn’t remember her,” says Orci. “It’s an in-joke that also speaks volumes about his character when it comes to women. That’s why we used it.”

I HATE THIS KIND OF SHIT FROM THE REBOOT MOVIES, KIRK IS NOT AN OVERSEXED ASSHOLE OKAY WHEN HE MEETS PEOPLE HE CARES ABOUT PEOPLE, TOS KIRK IS A LADY-KILLER YEAH BUT HE GENUINELY ENJOYS THEIR COMPANY AND THINKS ON THEIR TIME TOGETHER FONDLY, KIRK ISN’T A DOUCHEBAG OKAY BOB ORCI GET THAT THROUGH YOUR HEAD

The fact that he forgot A MEMBER OF HIS OWN CREW is just another level to me.

Fuck Orci.

# Can we as the fandom collectively agree that THIS DID NOT ACTUALLY HAPPEN? # Don’t get me wrong. # We all make mistakes when we’re younger and some of us sleep we people we shouldn’t. # But this was a crew member # someone who worked with McCoy # who (we can deduce) applied for a transfer because of the way Kirk treated her. # It’s not funny. # It’s completely out of touch with Roddenberry’s vision for Trek. # Remember what Kirk said in ‘The Naked Time’? # Because I do. # He said to Spock # ’You’re allowed to notice her. The Captain’s not permitted.’ # And I don’t want to hear that AOS Kirk is 1) young and 2) grew up without a father. # This was not not not in the spirit of his character and I refuse to accept that it happened. # rant # star trek into darkness # I forgot how much this movie pissed me off

(tags from museaway)

I’m on board with this idea. I actually just assumed that Chapel was at the academy or something at the time because it didn’t occur to me to think of Kirk fooling around with his crew, but now that it’s been suggested, I’m pissed again. I want to lock Abrams and company into a small room and make them watch the original series. We can even pause after each scene that proves Jim Kirk is not the asshole they want him to be. 

McCoy addresses her in STXI (He calls to her off screen, “Nurse Chapel”) so I have always assumed she’s the same age and probably served with them, hence the line about her being “much happier” on the other ship. I forget its name. I hate this movie. 

EW. 

Everyone has made such great points regarding these characters and how they are portrayed and I agree completely. So I’d like to take a moment and talk about the actors.

In the first movie the film makers chose to honor the original cast members that had passed - DeForest Kelley, aka Leonard McCoy and James Doohan aka Montgomery Scott.

They did this with James Doohan’s son dressed as an engineer and having a cameo with the ‘new’ Scotty, and by hiring Karl Urban to play McCoy. (if you think his portrayal of McCoy was anything but a love letter to Deforest and McCoy, you are wrong. Leonard Nimoy says so) Both Karl and Simon have spoken very positively and graciously about their predecessors.

Majel Barrett-Roddenberry, the actress that played Christine Chapel died prior to the release of the reboot, but after it had been filmed. Because of the timing I was ok with her not being recognized or honored the way DeForest Kelley and James Doohan had. There was always the next movie right?

This is how they choose to ‘honor’ Majel Barrett-Roddenberry.

And this is not an attempt to take anything away from DeForest Kelley and James Doohan, or to down play their contributions to their iconic roles. They each played their character over many, many years and over several series- in TOS, TAS, movies and each had an episode of ST:TNG. But I would just like to point out a few things about Majel Barrett-Roddenberry.

Copy/pasted from memory alpha:

Barrett was the only performer to have had a role on all of the Star Trek series – usually not as a character but as the voice of the various computers used throughout the series. She also supplied the voice of the Enterprise computer in five of the Star Trek films- spanning all three film series (Original Series, The Next Generation Series, and the Alternate Reality Series).

Her most frequent portrayal in Star Trek, besides the computer, was that of Nurse (later Doctor) Christine Chapel on Star Trek: The Original Series, Star Trek: The Animated Series, and in two of the films. She also voiced M’Ress and several other characters on The Animated Series and later played Betazoid Ambassador Lwaxana Troi on Star Trek: The Next Generation and Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. Her first filmed appearance was in Star Trek: The Original Series pilot episode “The Cage” as Number One.

So to sum up:

Series that she performed in: every fucking one

Characters she played:

  • Only the voice of every federation Computer (that’s all…)
  • Number One
  • Christine Chapel
  • M’Ress
  • Lwaxana Troi (daughter of the Fifth House of Betazed, the Holder of the Sacred Chalice of Rixx, and Heir to the Holy Rings of Betazed)

And the best (only) way they could think to honor Majel was this.

Really? This is the best they could do?

Fuck them for ‘honoring’ “The First Lady of Star Trek” like this.

This scene made me so angry because not only was Majel’s career impacted by sexism when NBC execs in the 60’s decided that having a female first officer on a starship 300 years in the future would be utterly ridiculous, and was instead only allowed to play a female character in one of the very few acceptable female professions in the 1960’s as a nurse. But even worse, in the reboot, her character doesn’t even get to appear on screen because of sexism. Total bullshit from Orci, and a refutation of Star Trek’s image as progressive and ground-breaking media. 

wicked color analysis (insp)

chompersthecorgi:

"We are Corg.  You will be assimilated.  Resistance is futile."
Cy-borgi. The next generation of Corgis. 🐺😎 #chompersthecorgi #cyborgi #googleglass #glassexplorer
A friendly reminder to please put in your vote for me for the @7x7sf Cutest Canine Contest (only a week left to go and every DAILY vote counts!! Thank you so much for your support!! 🙏❤️
http://www.7x7.com/pets/vote-cutest-canine-2014-dog-poll-top-21#/18

chompersthecorgi:

"We are Corg.  You will be assimilated.  Resistance is futile."

Cy-borgi. The next generation of Corgis. 🐺😎 #chompersthecorgi #cyborgi #googleglass #glassexplorer

A friendly reminder to please put in your vote for me for the @7x7sf Cutest Canine Contest (only a week left to go and every DAILY vote counts!! Thank you so much for your support!! 🙏❤️

http://www.7x7.com/pets/vote-cutest-canine-2014-dog-poll-top-21#/18

amandaonwriting:

100 Beautiful and Ugly Words
by Mark Nichol
One of the many fascinating features of our language is how often words with pleasant associations are also quite pleasing on the tongue and even to the eye, and how many words, by contrast, acoustically and visually corroborate their disagreeable nature — look no further than the heading for this post.Enrich the poetry of your prose by applying words that provide precise connotation while also evoking emotional responses
Beautiful Words
Amorphous: indefinite, shapeless
Beguile: deceive
Caprice: impulse
Cascade: steep waterfall
Cashmere: fine, delicate wool
Chrysalis: protective covering
Cinnamon: an aromatic spice; its soft brown color
Coalesce: unite, or fuse
Crepuscular: dim, or twilit
Crystalline: clear, or sparkling
Desultory: half-hearted, meandering
Diaphanous: gauzy
Dulcet: sweet
Ebullient: enthusiastic
Effervescent: bubbly
Elision: omission
Enchanted: charmed
Encompass: surround
Enrapture: delighted
Ephemeral: fleeting
Epiphany: revelation
Epitome: embodiment of the ideal
Ethereal: celestial, unworldly, immaterial
Etiquette: proper conduct
Evanescent: fleeting
Evocative: suggestive
Exuberant: abundant, unrestrained, outsize
Felicity: happiness, pleasantness
Filament: thread, strand
Halcyon: care-free
Idyllic: contentedly pleasing
Incorporeal: without form
Incandescent: glowing, radiant, brilliant, zealous
Ineffable: indescribable, unspeakable
Inexorable: relentless
Insouciance: nonchalance
Iridescent: luster
Languid: slow, listless
Lassitude: fatigue
Lilt: cheerful or buoyant song or movement
Lithe: flexible, graceful
Lullaby: soothing song
Luminescence: dim chemical or organic light
Mellifluous: smooth, sweet
Mist: cloudy moisture, or similar literal or virtual obstacle
Murmur: soothing sound
Myriad: great number
Nebulous: indistinct
Opulent: ostentatious
Penumbra: shade, shroud, fringe
Plethora: abundance
Quiescent: peaceful
Quintessential: most purely representative or typical
Radiant: glowing
Redolent: aromatic, evocative
Resonant: echoing, evocative
Resplendent: shining
Rhapsodic: intensely emotional
Sapphire: rich, deep bluish purple
Scintilla: trace
Serendipitous: chance
Serene: peaceful
Somnolent: drowsy, sleep inducing
Sonorous: loud, impressive, imposing
Spherical: ball-like, globular
Sublime: exalted, transcendent
Succulent: juicy, tasty, rich
Suffuse: flushed, full
Susurration: whispering
Symphony: harmonious assemblage
Talisman: charm, magical device
Tessellated: checkered in pattern
Tranquility: peacefulness
Vestige: trace
Zenith: highest point
Ugly Words
Cacophony: confused noise
Cataclysm: flood, catastrophe, upheaval
Chafe: irritate, abrade
Coarse: common, crude, rough, harsh
Cynical: distrustful, self-interested
Decrepit: worn-out, run-down
Disgust: aversion, distaste
Grimace: expression of disgust or pain
Grotesque: distorted, bizarre
Harangue: rant
Hirsute: hairy
Hoarse: harsh, grating
Leech: parasite,
Maladroit: clumsy
Mediocre: ordinary, of low quality
Obstreperous: noisy, unruly
Rancid: offensive, smelly
Repugnant: distasteful
Repulsive: disgusting
Shriek: sharp, screeching sound
Shrill: high-pitched sound
Shun: avoid, ostracize
Slaughter: butcher, carnage
Unctuous: smug, ingratiating
Visceral: crude, anatomically graphic
Notice how often attractive words present themselves to define other beautiful ones, and note also how many of them are interrelated, and what kind of sensations, impressions, and emotions they have in common. Also, try enunciating beautiful words as if they were ugly, or vice versa. Are their sounds suggestive of their quality, or does their meaning wholly determine their effect on us?
From Writers Write

amandaonwriting:

100 Beautiful and Ugly Words

by Mark Nichol

One of the many fascinating features of our language is how often words with pleasant associations are also quite pleasing on the tongue and even to the eye, and how many words, by contrast, acoustically and visually corroborate their disagreeable nature — look no further than the heading for this post.
Enrich the poetry of your prose by applying words that provide precise connotation while also evoking emotional responses

Beautiful Words

  • Amorphous: indefinite, shapeless
  • Beguile: deceive
  • Caprice: impulse
  • Cascade: steep waterfall
  • Cashmere: fine, delicate wool
  • Chrysalis: protective covering
  • Cinnamon: an aromatic spice; its soft brown color
  • Coalesce: unite, or fuse
  • Crepuscular: dim, or twilit
  • Crystalline: clear, or sparkling
  • Desultory: half-hearted, meandering
  • Diaphanous: gauzy
  • Dulcet: sweet
  • Ebullient: enthusiastic
  • Effervescent: bubbly
  • Elision: omission
  • Enchanted: charmed
  • Encompass: surround
  • Enrapture: delighted
  • Ephemeral: fleeting
  • Epiphany: revelation
  • Epitome: embodiment of the ideal
  • Ethereal: celestial, unworldly, immaterial
  • Etiquette: proper conduct
  • Evanescent: fleeting
  • Evocative: suggestive
  • Exuberant: abundant, unrestrained, outsize
  • Felicity: happiness, pleasantness
  • Filament: thread, strand
  • Halcyon: care-free
  • Idyllic: contentedly pleasing
  • Incorporeal: without form
  • Incandescent: glowing, radiant, brilliant, zealous
  • Ineffable: indescribable, unspeakable
  • Inexorable: relentless
  • Insouciance: nonchalance
  • Iridescent: luster
  • Languid: slow, listless
  • Lassitude: fatigue
  • Lilt: cheerful or buoyant song or movement
  • Lithe: flexible, graceful
  • Lullaby: soothing song
  • Luminescence: dim chemical or organic light
  • Mellifluous: smooth, sweet
  • Mist: cloudy moisture, or similar literal or virtual obstacle
  • Murmur: soothing sound
  • Myriad: great number
  • Nebulous: indistinct
  • Opulent: ostentatious
  • Penumbra: shade, shroud, fringe
  • Plethora: abundance
  • Quiescent: peaceful
  • Quintessential: most purely representative or typical
  • Radiant: glowing
  • Redolent: aromatic, evocative
  • Resonant: echoing, evocative
  • Resplendent: shining
  • Rhapsodic: intensely emotional
  • Sapphire: rich, deep bluish purple
  • Scintilla: trace
  • Serendipitous: chance
  • Serene: peaceful
  • Somnolent: drowsy, sleep inducing
  • Sonorous: loud, impressive, imposing
  • Spherical: ball-like, globular
  • Sublime: exalted, transcendent
  • Succulent: juicy, tasty, rich
  • Suffuse: flushed, full
  • Susurration: whispering
  • Symphony: harmonious assemblage
  • Talisman: charm, magical device
  • Tessellated: checkered in pattern
  • Tranquility: peacefulness
  • Vestige: trace
  • Zenith: highest point

Ugly Words

  • Cacophony: confused noise
  • Cataclysm: flood, catastrophe, upheaval
  • Chafe: irritate, abrade
  • Coarse: common, crude, rough, harsh
  • Cynical: distrustful, self-interested
  • Decrepit: worn-out, run-down
  • Disgust: aversion, distaste
  • Grimace: expression of disgust or pain
  • Grotesque: distorted, bizarre
  • Harangue: rant
  • Hirsute: hairy
  • Hoarse: harsh, grating
  • Leech: parasite,
  • Maladroit: clumsy
  • Mediocre: ordinary, of low quality
  • Obstreperous: noisy, unruly
  • Rancid: offensive, smelly
  • Repugnant: distasteful
  • Repulsive: disgusting
  • Shriek: sharp, screeching sound
  • Shrill: high-pitched sound
  • Shun: avoid, ostracize
  • Slaughter: butcher, carnage
  • Unctuous: smug, ingratiating
  • Visceral: crude, anatomically graphic

Notice how often attractive words present themselves to define other beautiful ones, and note also how many of them are interrelated, and what kind of sensations, impressions, and emotions they have in common. Also, try enunciating beautiful words as if they were ugly, or vice versa. Are their sounds suggestive of their quality, or does their meaning wholly determine their effect on us?

From Writers Write